How Small Was The Universe Before Inflation?

In the first period, the universe grew from an almost infinitely small point to nearly an octillion (that's a 1 followed by 27 zeros) times that in size in less than a trillionth of a second. This inflation period was followed by a more gradual, but violent, period of expansion we know as the Big Bang. via

What happened to the universe after inflation?

Following the inflationary period, the universe continued to expand, but at a slower rate. Quantum fluctuations in the microscopic inflationary region, magnified to cosmic size, become the seeds for the growth of structure in the Universe (see galaxy formation and evolution and structure formation). via

How big was the universe at the moment of its creation?

Most physicists, he begins, agree on the big-bang theory, which says that 14 billion years ago the entire observable universe was “roughly a million billion billion times smaller than a single atom” and has been expanding ever since, to its current size of something like 100 billion galaxies. via

Is the universe still inflating?

According to eternal inflation, the inflationary phase of the universe's expansion lasts forever throughout most of the universe. Because the regions expand exponentially rapidly, most of the volume of the universe at any given time is inflating. via

What is smallest thing in universe?

Quarks are among the smallest particles in the universe, and they carry only fractional electric charges. Scientists have a good idea of how quarks make up hadrons, but the properties of individual quarks have been difficult to tease out because they can't be observed outside of their respective hadrons. via

What is outside the universe?

The universe, being all there is, is infinitely big and has no edge, so there's no outside to even talk about. The current width of the observable universe is about 90 billion light-years. And presumably, beyond that boundary, there's a bunch of other random stars and galaxies. via

What happens when you reach the end of space?

It will expand forever; the galaxies within groups and clusters will merge together to form a giant super-galaxy; the individual super-galaxies will accelerate away from one another; the stars will all die or get sucked into supermassive black holes; and then the stellar corpses will get ejected while the black holes via

What came first in the universe?

The Universe begins 13.7 billion years ago with an event known as the Big Bang. Both time and space are created in this event. Nuclei of hydrogen, helium, lithium and other light elements form. via

Where did all matter come from?

Origins. In the first moments after the Big Bang, the universe was extremely hot and dense. As the universe cooled, conditions became just right to give rise to the building blocks of matter – the quarks and electrons of which we are all made. via

Who created the universe?

Many religious persons, including many scientists, hold that God created the universe and the various processes driving physical and biological evolution and that these processes then resulted in the creation of galaxies, our solar system, and life on Earth. via

Why doesn't inflation violate the speed of light?

In an inflationary Universe, any two particles, beyond a tiny fraction of a second, will see the other one recede from them at speeds appearing to be faster-than-light. But the reason for this isn't because the particles themselves are moving, but rather because the space between them is expanding. via

Is our universe in a bubble?

Nevertheless, some cosmologists have a response: Our universe is a swelling bubble. Outside it, more bubble universes exist, all immersed in an eternally expanding and energized sea — the multiverse. via

How many universes are there?

There are still some scientists who would say, hogwash. The only meaningful answer to the question of how many universes there are is one, only one universe. via

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